Tuesday, April 21, 2015

Chicken Kelaguen Recipe

Chicken kelaguen

If you have not heard of chicken kelaguen, and cannot guess what it is and where it comes from, don’t be disappointed. I did not know also until I ‘ran into it’ by chance.

It happened in Hagåtña, the capital of Guam, in the Northern Pacific. I was on my way to see a famous monument called Latte of Freedom.
 
Source: The Guam Guide

The monument is in the shape of a very large cup. As you can see, you cannot really drink latte from it. Neither can you fill it up with latte and swim in it. But you can take pictures of it (which I didn't do). Anyway, on my way there I asked a girl for directions. She was not from the area so she did not know where the latte was. She was standing at the entrance to a building, selling local food. There were two piles of plastic containers, one contained chicken, the other contained shrimp. Both were finely diced, came with a tortilla and looked bland and boring. She was nice and friendly, so I bought the chicken version.

I then walked to Latte of Freedom but decided not to pay the entry fee required. Waste of money I thought since all you get is a view. I sat by the seawall to eat my chicken dish. To call it bland and boring would be an insult. It was the complete opposite, tasted fresh and packed with flavour. A really simple but delicious dish. The girl had left when I got back so I got this recipe from the internet.



Ingredients
10 chicken thighs (boneless and skinless)
1 medium onion, chopped
1 green onion, finely chopped
5 hot pepper (donne' sali or thai peppers)
1 cup freshly grated coconut
Juice from six medium lemons
Lemon flavored powder (if you got it, I didn’t use it)
Salt and black pepper to taste

Method
1.   Cook the chicken (broil, pan fry, bake or cook any other way). No seasoning is needed.
2.   Once chicken is cooled, finely dice it.
3. Place in a bowl, add the rest of the ingredients and mix thoroughly. Add more seasoning, lemon or peppers if you want



Chicken kelaguen

Tuesday, February 3, 2015

Crispy Teriyaki Pork Belly Recipe


Crispy Teriyaki Pork Belly

I made Crispy Chinese Roasted Pork Belly about 2 months ago. The belly, and the cracking, was so good that I had to make it again. This time I used teriyaki marinade, hence moving from China to Japan. I liked both versions equally.

In case you are concerned about the fat content, consider the following:
·   The thick white bit that you think is fat is actually about half fat and half something else (I can’t remember the name)
·       Less than 40% of the total fat is saturated fat
·       If cooked  on a wire rack, part of the fat gets rendered
·  So the total fat content of the belly after cooking and after the fat has rendered may be comparable to the fat content of sausages
·     If you like to cook pork belly over a bed of greens, the greens will absorb the fat and you won’t notice it. So eating more of those ‘fat free’ greens will counter the guilty feeling from eating pork belly.

       Hope I have convinced you to try pork belly, in case you haven’t tried it yet.

Adopted from an earlier recipe I did for Crispy Chinese Roasted Pork Belly

Crispy Teriyaki Pork Belly


Ingredients
800g boneless pork belly, skin on and scored
500ml boiling water
1 tablespoon sesame oil
1 tablespoon salt flakes

Sauce
½ cup soy sauce
½ cup mirin
2 tablespoons sugar
1½ teaspoons minced garlic
1½ teaspoons minced ginger

Method
1.      Combine ingredients for the sauce in a saucepan and reduce on medium heat until the sauce thickens
2.      Place pork belly, skin-side up, on a wire rack over the sink. Pour over boiling water to scald the pork skin. If possible, try to avoid hot water getting on the meat as it will cook it slightly
3.      Dry the skin with kitchen paper and place pork, uncovered, in the refrigerator for two hours.
4.      Remove pork from fridge and place, skin-side up, on a chopping board. Using the tip of a sharp knife, stab the pork skin repeatedly until the surface is covered with holes, being careful not to go all the way through.
5.      Turn the pork belly over and make cuts about 2cm apart and 1cm deep.
6.      Rub marinade evenly over the flesh side of the pork (not the skin) and massage well into the cuts.
7.      Place pork, skin-side up, on a wire rack (this same rack will be used for roasting the pork, so make sure it is ovenproof and fits inside a roasting tin) and place over a tray or large plate to catch any drips. Place in refrigerator and leave pork uncovered overnight
8.      The next day, bring pork to room temperature and heat oven to 150°C/300°F
9.      Transfer pork and wire rack to a roasting tin. Rub skin well with the sesame oil, then scatter salt all over. Roast for 1½–2 hours or until tender (to test, pierce the meat with a skewer – you should meet no resistance).
10.  Increase the oven temperature to 220°C/430°F and continue roasting for 15 minutes.

11.  Remove pork from oven and allow to rest, uncovered, in a warm place for 15 minutes.

Monday, January 26, 2015

Thai Pork Larb Recipe


Thai Pork Larb
I first heard of pork larb while watching My Kitchen Rules (New Zealand). The judges, two well known chefs, kept talking about how delicious it was. So I thought if they say its delicious, it must be delicious. 

For some unknown reason, larb does not appear on restaurant menu’s. I never saw it until I visited a Thai restaurant in Germany. I had to order it, and then I had to make it at home. Because it was delicious, and easy to prepare.

Adopted from BBC

Ingredients
200g/7oz lean pork mince
1 red pepper, seeds removed, thinly sliced
1 small bunch coriander, chopped
1 small handful mint leaves, chopped
6 spring onions, finely sliced
1 small red onion, thinly sliced
2 red chillies, finely chopped
2 limes, juice only
1 clove garlic, minced
4 tablespoon Thai fish sauce (nam pla)
1-2 tablespoon Thai sweet chilli sauce
Pinch palm sugar or caster sugar
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
20grams finely chopped roasted peanuts (optional)
Lettuce leaves

Method
1.      Heat the vegetable oil in a large pan over a medium-high heat. Fry the mince with the red pepper and half of the red onion for about five minutes or until the pork is cooked through and browned in places. Drain off any excess liquid and set aside.
2.      In a large bowl, combine all of the remaining ingredients, apart from the peanuts, then add the hot pork and stir to combine. Taste the mixture and add more fish sauce or palm sugar, to taste.
3.      Spoon the pork mixture among lettuce leaves and sprinkle with peanuts to serve.


Thai Pork Larb

Wednesday, January 7, 2015

Cheesy Filo Sausage Roll Recipe


Cheesy Filo Sausage Roll

Sausage rolls are generally made with puff pastry. This was my first time trying a filo sausage roll, and I am quite pleased with the result. I am not sure whether I prefer the puff or filo version, they are both good in their own special ways. Assembling the filo version takes a bit more effort. The sheets need to be brushed with butter, and rolled with care since these things are quite fragile. The filo version has lower fat content, which means you can eat more without feeling guilty.

The filling is quite versatile. You can add pretty much anything that makes sense. For a flavor boost, substitute some of the mince with bacon. To add some carrots or other veges to healthify it. I think you can also add some finely diced tofu and it won’t be noticable.

You can make extra and freeze it. Bake it from frozen, no need to defrost. 

Cheesy Filo Sausage Roll


Ingredients
300g beef or pork mince
½ cup dried breadcrumbs
½ cup milk
3 cloves garlic
½ small onion, finely diced
½ teaspoon mixed herbs
30 -40 grams cheese, ½ cm cubed (or shredded, but I prefer chunky bits of cheese)
Salt and pepper to taste
8 sheets filo pastry
Melted butter

Method
1.      Mix breadcrumbs and milk in a bowl and set aside for 2 minutes
2.      In a bowl, combine the rest of the ingredients except filo and butter.  Season with salt and pepper
3.      Lightly brush the filo pastry with butter and lay them on top of each other. Place the meat mixture in a log shape at one end of the filo pastry. Tightly roll the filo dough
4.      Baked on a lined baking tray at 200°C/390°F for about 20 minutes. The outer part should be golden brown and delicious. Rest for 5 minutes before eating, if possible!

Friday, December 19, 2014

Crispy Chinese Roasted Pork Belly Recipe


Crispy Chinese Roasted Pork Belly

This is the nicest crackling I ever had. Really crispy, no chance of breaking my teeth. And the meat had a fantastic flavour. Soy, garlic, miso and five-spice powder all worked well together and produced a good result.

I have made crispy pork using different methods but the method suggested in the recipe, pouring boiling water over the skin, did miracles.

Adopted from Kylie Kwong’s recipe, posted on The Guardian

Crispy Chinese Roasted Pork Belly


Ingredients
800g boneless pork belly, skin on and scored
500ml boiling water
4 cloves garlic, halved
1 tablespoon sesame oil
1 tablespoon salt flakes

For the marinade
2 tablespoons brown rice miso paste
1 tablespoon five-spice powder
1 tablespoon brown sugar
1 tablespoon light soy sauce

Method
1.      Place pork belly, skin-side up, on a wire rack over the sink. Pour over boiling water to scald the pork skin. If possible, try to avoid hot water getting on the meat as it will cook it slightly
2.      Dry the skin with kitchen paper and place pork, uncovered, in the refrigerator for two hours.
3.      Remove pork from fridge and place, skin-side up, on a chopping board. Using the tip of a sharp knife, stab the pork skin repeatedly until the surface is covered with holes, being careful not to go all the way through.
4.      Make some horizontal slits on the sides of the belly, then insert each garlic and push them deep in so they don’t burn.
5.      Turn the pork belly over and make cuts about 2cm apart and 1cm deep.
6.      Combine marinade ingredients. Rub marinade evenly over the flesh side of the pork (not the skin) and massage well into the cuts.
7.      Place pork, skin-side up, on a wire rack (this same rack will be used for roasting the pork, so make sure it is ovenproof and fits inside a roasting tin) and place over a tray or large plate to catch any drips. Place in refrigerator and leave pork uncovered overnight
8.      The next day, bring pork to room temperature and heat oven to 150°C/300°F
9.      Transfer pork and wire rack to a roasting tin. Rub skin well with the sesame oil, then scatter salt all over. Roast for 1½–2 hours or until tender (to test, pierce the meat with a skewer – you should meet no resistance).
10.  Increase the oven temperature to 220°C/430°F and continue roasting for 15 minutes.
11.  Remove pork from oven and allow to rest, uncovered, in a warm place for 15 minutes.


Wednesday, December 10, 2014

Texas Quorn Chili with Spinach Recipe



Texas Quorn Chili with Spinach

Recently I received a bag of Quorn mince to try. Quorn is a meat substitute. According to the Quorn website, “Quorn products main ingredient is Mycoprotein which is a nutritionally healthy protein source. Mycoprotein is produced by a process of fermentation similar to that used in the fermentation of yeast in bread.” This didn’t make too much sense to me, so I consulted Wiki. Here’s wiki’s explanation:

“Quorn is made from the soil mould Fusarium venenatum strain PTA-2684. The fungus is grown in continually oxygenated water in large, otherwise sterile fermentation tanks. Glucose and fixed nitrogen are added as a food for the fungus, as are vitamins and minerals to improve the food value of the product. The resulting mycoprotein is then extracted and heat-treated to remove excess levels of RNA. The product is dried and mixed with egg albumen, which acts as a binder. It is then textured, giving it some of the grained character of meat, and pressed either into a mince resembling ground beef; forms resembling chicken breasts, meatballs, and turkey roasts; or chunks resembling diced chicken breast.”

So Quorn is produced by growing fungus in water, then it is mixed with egg whites. I suppose Quorn is quite different from laboratory grown beef.

I decided to use the fungus and egg white mixture (aka Quorn) to make Texas chili. It turned out OK. The Quorn was too soft. It felt slightly mushy but held together, if that makes sense. Quorn definitely looked like minced meat, but didn’t really feel or taste like it. However strong sauces will mask the taste, so you won’t know whether you are eating Quorn or meat.

Quorn, or other meat substitutes, don't necessarily have to taste or feel like meat, as long as it tastes delicious on its own. For example, tofu's texture is nice (debatable). Unfortunately Quorn's texture was not appealing to me, I would rather eat tofu, other vege or meat.

Adopted from Quorn.se


Ingredients
300 g Quorn mince
1 carrot, diced
1 onion, diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
3 tablespoons olive oil
200 g crushed tomato
100 grams spinach, chopped
1 bay leaf
1 tablespoon soya sauce
2 tablespoons honey
1-2 tablespoon vegetable fond
1 tablespoon Hickory liquid smoke
1 tablespoon ground cumin
1 tablespoon chili spice mix
0,5 lime (juice)
Salt and pepper

Method
1.      Heat olive oil in a casserole over medium heat
2.      Add all vegetables, except spinach, and cook until softened
3.      Add the rest of the ingredients, except the Quorn and spinach, and cook covered for 10 - 20 min.
4.      Add Quorn, reduce heat and simmer for maximum 20 minutes. In the last 5 minutes, add spinach. Add water if it looks too dry. Add salt and pepper to taste.


Texas Quorn Chili with Spinach


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